The Counter-Terrorism and Security Act 2015 contains a duty on specified authorities to have due regard to the need to prevent people from being drawn into terrorism. More detail about our Scottish requirements can be found in the Revised Prevent Duty Guidance: For Scotland . Read 1328 times . This is called the ‘Prevent duty’. There have been some well publicised criticisms of the Prevent Duty across print and social media. Introduction 5. This advice focuses on those four themes. The Prevent Duty Guidance places a duty on schools, and child care providers, to “have due regard to the need to prevent people from being drawn into terrorism”. Prevent Duty Guidance issued on 16th July 2015. Guidance on the Prevent Duty states that action taken under the duty “must not involve any covert activity against people or communities.” However, the 2010 Equality Act goes much wider in prohibiting discrimination on the grounds of protected characteristics, which include race, religion and belief. 4. Prevent is one of four strands of the government’s counter-terrorism strategy. Prevent Duty Guidance . Section 26(1) of the Counter-Terrorism and Security Act 2015 (“the Act”) imposes a duty on “specified authorities”, when exercising their functions, to have due regard to the need to prevent people from being drawn into terrorism. This is for school leaders, teachers, practitioners and partners . Prevent duty implications for members working in the prison and probation system (pdf 81KB) Designated individuals. Tags: Citizenship. The government created two sets of statutory guidance to support the strategy, one of which is specifically for higher education bodies. Whilst Prevent duty guidance identifies the specified authorities who must have due regard,it is also imperative to . This is called the Prevent duty. Prevent duty What is Prevent Duty? Reporting concerns. What is the ‘Prevent Duty?’ ‘Prevent’ relates to the Counter Terrorism and Security Act 2015 which came into force on 1 July 2015. Duty to prevent people being drawn into terrorism: specified authorities (Prevent duty) Section 26 of the Counter-Terrorism and Security Act 2015 (the Act) places a duty on certain bodies (“specified authorities” listed in Schedule 6 to the Act), in the exercise of their functions, to have “due regard to the need to prevent people from being drawn into terrorism”. If you have previously undertaken Prevent training you will understand the importance of the topic. What is expected of schools and educational settings? Higher education 1. Can this be a hyperlink to the downloadable Norfolk Prevent Strategy Document pdf. Information about the threat of, risk from and vulnerability to terrorism and violent extremism is shared with the national Prevent leads for the higher education sector at both a senior leadership and operational level. The Commission is currently considering developing similar content for stakeholders in Scotland and Wales. HM GOVERNMENT - THE REVISED PREVENT DUTY GUIDANCE (March 2015) Statutory guidance for specified authorities issued by HM Govt on the duty in the Counter-Terrorism and Security Act 2015. Helpline. Risk assessment . The Prevent Duty Guidance is in regards to the Counter-Terrorism and Security Act 2015, which contains a duty on specified authorities to have due regard to the need to prevent people from being drawn into terrorism. In March 2015, parliament approved guidance (issued under section 29 of the Act) for specified authorities, which they must have regard to when complying with the duty. The Prevent duty aims to safeguard people from becoming terrorists or supporting terrorism. Risk assessment . Who is this for? This is introductory training. Prevent Duty: Early Help and Children’s Social Care Extremism Guidance and Assessment Support . Guidance for schools and childcare providers on preventing children and young people from being drawn into terrorism. November 2019 7 . It is a criminal offence for a person to deal with funds or economic resources belonging to, owned or held by a designated individual or entity. note that Prevent is part of the safeguarding framework and that safeguarding is everyone’s business. The Prevent Duty, advise for schools and childcare providers - This how the Prevent Duty operates within schools and childcare providers. The statutory guidance on the Prevent duty summarises the requirements on schools and childcare providers in terms of four general themes: risk assessment, working in partnership, staff training and IT policies. All specified authorities must have due regard to the need to prevent people from being drawn into terrorism. 2 Prevent Duty Guidance in England and Wales B. 2 1. S26 of the Counter-Terrorism and Security Act 2015 places a duty on certain bodies to have “due regard to the need to prevent people from being drawn into terrorism”. Read the guidance: Delivering the Prevent duty in a proportionate and fair way. To fulfil this duty it is essential that staff can identify children who may be vulnerable to radicalisation, and know what to do when they are identified. AD 2/3 Due regard As mentioned above, schools and colleges must have “due regard” to the need to prevent people from being drawn into terrorism. The aim of the Prevent strategy is to reduce the threat to the UK from terrorism by stopping people becoming terrorists or supporting terrorism. For more information, read our Prevent Strategy PDF, 143KB. The guidance can be found via the image on the … guidance/revised-prevent-duty-guidance-for-england-and-wales The statutory guidance provides detailed information about the exact nature of the Prevent, duty, and the organisations to which it applies. Since July 1 2015 there has been a duty on schools to have ‘due regard to the need to prevent people from being drawn into terrorism’. This is a duty on all schools and registered early years providers to have due regard to preventing people being drawn into terrorism. Read further prevent duty guidance for use in England, Wales, and Scotland - including information for higher and further education institutions. The Prevent Duty Guidance 2019-20. It places a duty on specific bodies to have ‘due regard to prevent people from being drawn into terrorism’. Further education 1. Related items. A link to the prevent duty guidance is available at the end of this e-Learning. This advice focuses on those four themes. Why are we hearing so much about it and why is the Prevent Duty so controversial? What is this? There is Prevent duty statutory guidance for England and Wales, and separately for Scotland, issued under section 29 of the Counter-Terrorism and Security Act 2015. Prevent Duty Guidance issued on 16th July 2015. Issued March 2015 and revised July 2015. Government Prevent Duty Guidance for England, Scotland and Wales Government Guidance: Cancelling the passport of a child at risk of radicalisation Government Guidance: the use of social media for online radicalisation Government Counter-Terrorism Strategy (CONTEST) Prevent Strategy 2011 Greater Manchester Safeguarding Procedures: Safeguarding Children and Young People Vulnerable to … The government’s Prevent duty guidance to universities is unlawful and must be rewritten, judges have ruled after a successful judicial review argued that it violated freedom of speech. Prevent Duty Guidance: for Scotland) who provide exception reporting to the Multi-Agency Strategic CONTEST Board. Prevent duty guidance. The Office for Students (OfS) monitors what higher education providers do to prevent people from being drawn into terrorism and assesses how they meet the requirements under the duty. What is the ‘Prevent Duty?’ ‘Prevent’ relates to the Counter Terrorism and Security Act 2015 which came into force on 1 July 2015. Introduction The purpose of this document is to provide background information and support for family support workers, social workers and wider children’s practitioners involved with cases where there is a suspected extremism concern with regards to a child or young person (CYP). The Prevent strategy, published by the Government in 2011, is part of our overall counter-terrorism strategy, CONTEST. In order to protect children in your care, you must be alert to any reason for concern in the child’s life at home or elsewhere. Since July 1 2015 there has been a duty on schools to have ‘due regard to the need to prevent people from being drawn into terrorism’. What is the Prevent duty? Section 26(1) of the Counter-Terrorism and Security Act 2015 (“the Act”) imposes a duty on “specified authorities”, when exercising their functions, to have due regard to the need to prevent people from being drawn into terrorism. Universities became subject to the Prevent duty on 18 September 2015. This page sets out the Scottish approach to safeguarding and protecting the wellbeing of vulnerable young people from the influence of people promoting violent extremism and terrorism. The statutory guidance on the Prevent duty summarises the requirements on schools and childcare providers in terms of four general themes: risk assessment, working in partnership, staff training and IT policies. Prevent Duty Guidance: for England and Wales, this document covers Prevent as a whole strategy.. It focuses on radicalisation, extremism and counter-terrorism threats. 19. November 2019 6 . The Prevent duty is the duty in the Counter-Terrorism and Security Act 2015 on specified authorities, in the exercise of their functions, to have due regard to the need to prevent people from being drawn into terrorism. The Prevent Duty in 2018. The Prevent Duty Guidance. The Prevent Duty is about safeguarding people and communities from the threat of terrorism by working with individuals before they become radicalised and commit an offence by supporting or carrying out an act of extremism or violent extremism. This guide is relevant to higher education providers in England only. of our armed forces” (Prevent Duty Guidance: for England and Wales, 2015). It will provide an important foundation on which to develop further knowledge around the risks of radicalisation and the role that you can play in supporting those at risk. The Prevent duty became law back in 2015. The current threat from Terrorism and Extremism in the United Kingdom is real and severe and can involve the exploitation of vulnerable people, including children to involve them in extremist activity.